April Gallery Opening: Anne Wolf & Blake Luther

Join Evolutionary Health Care on April 21st from 6pm – 9pm as we celebrate the work of Blake Luther and Anne Wolfer.

The work of these two Salt Lake City oil paint artist will be open to the pubic for a Friday night gallery stroll.

About the Artist 

Blake Luther:

“After several years of plein air painting, where the approach is pretty direct and necessarily fast, I’m currently moving into the studio exploring different ways to get at a painting – to get at the idea of a painting.

While I rely heavily on the hard-learned lessons and experiences of painting outside, I am enjoying the shift the scale of the pieces and the range of options, marks, effects that painting in the controlled and calm atmosphere of the studio.

All of the larger current landscape paintings were referenced from small plein air paintings of the same scenes.

But I still look forward to painting outside.”

  

Anne Wolfer:

I don’t exactly know why I am so drawn to painting buildings in the landscape but I suspect it has to do with how light hits the different surfaces. My interest lies in those subtle shifts in value and color as light moves across the planes of a building set in the landscape.

A few years back while painting outdoors, I started using a palette knife to lay down more paint and be less cautious about recreating the landscape in front of me. Instead, I became more concerned with making a “painting” and less concerned about realism. Over time those paintings have become more abstract. While I still love painting outdoors, these days I have a lot of fun mixing up big piles of paint in the studio and placing thick patches of color next to each other drawing from the many hours spent outdoors looking at color and the affects of light.

More recently, I have become fascinated using a very limited palette and how one can develop a vibrant painting using so few colors. That discovery really happened when I started using acrylics for under paintings. I began noticing how colorful the paintings were using only 4 or 5 colors. Now a days, I’m more careful when I pull out a cadmium orange or a thalo blue knowing that I can get pretty far along with a yellow ocher and paynes gray.”